by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  

We’re in the middle of vetting financial education providers for our employees; a top criterion is having a certified financial planner (CFP) paid by the hour, not by commission. The reason is simple: We don’t want an incentive to guide employees toward specific investments sold by the CFP.

by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  

We have the good fortune of working with hundreds of wellness professionals from all industries and circumstances each year and have learned which traits seem to always help the most successful stay at the top of the heap.


  • Verbal and written communication skills. Within the first few conversations and written exchanges we can usually tell if we’re working with a high-achieving wellness professional. They have the unique ability to communicate their message at the level their audience understands and responds to, without sounding patronizing. They’re generally jargon-free and direct without sounding abrupt. And they are exceptional listeners.
  • Achievement orientation. They keep score — if not formally, in their head. They want to know why they had 40% signup this time when they had 44% last time. They set goals for themselves and their wellness program and hold themselves accountable for reaching them. If they fall short of their own expectations they look first to their role and actions before outside causes.
by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  

The new release of classic fairytale Cinderella reminds us that wellness sometimes gets little attention compared to other employee benefits. While health insurance and paid vacation aren’t the equivalent of Anastasia and Drizella, wellness managers need to remember we’re competing for budgets, time, and attention. So if you want to wear the glass slipper, you can’t wait for the Fairy Godmother to make an appearance — you have to take steps yourself to be invited to the ball. Here’s how:

by Dean Witherspoon   Dean's profile on LinkedIn  

Each week I get 5-15 requests to connect with someone on LinkedIn. In almost every instance, the only commonality is we work in health or wellness. That’s not enough to make a meaningful connection.

Of course if your goal is bragging rights for how many connections you can amass, keep them coming. But if you want to create a network that offers definite value, get ready to do some actual work. Here’s how: